First Aid at Work

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Medical emergencies and accidents happen in the work place (and everywhere else) every day - they are an inevitable part of everyday life. Usually on the occasions the first person at the scene to help when somebody is injured or having a medical emergency is a friend or co worker who happens to be on the scene at the time. If that person has had the right training they can do everything reasonably within their power to help that person and give them the best possible chance of survival and recovery by acting quickly and appropriately. This will only be possible if they have had the right training and it is up to their employer to ensure that they have this training.

It is important that employers recognise that they have a responsibility to ensure enough of their workers have had the right training so that they can be of maximum assistance when an emergency occurs. Attending one of the first aid courses available will ensure that the individual will have the training to deal with all sorts of medical emergencies such as heart attack, electric shock, burns, cuts, fractures, eye injuries, falls, fainting, diabetic emergencies, seizures, poisoning, asthma and many others. The trainee will know how to respond quickly to any of these emergencies, hopefully being able to stabilise the patient and give them the appropriate care until the emergency services arrive if needed. Emergency CPR is an important life saving skill that needs to be learned for first response situations. The trainee will learn to be able to assess the situation and take the necessary action quickly.

Many employees will feel a sense of personal pride and accomplishment having attended a first aid course, it is of great benefit to their co workers who will feel better looked after in their workplace and it will look great on the person’s CV as well. Any potential future employer is bound to take notice and attach some extra value to this qualification, not to mention saving them the money it would have cost them to train someone else.

Manual Handling Safety Training

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Manual Handling Training Courses

Manual handling is known to be the cause of over a third of the back injuries sustained in the workplace today, a great deal of these injuries can be avoided by adopting safer posture and being aware of how to avoid excessive strain on the spine.

One of the courses available is the manual handling training at RoSPA which is aimed at improving the training efficiency of safety trainers and managers, the aims being to recognise risks associated with manual handling in the workplace. It covers a number of key aspects to risk assessment including developing knowledge of the structure of the spine, what kind of activities tend to cause back pain and injuries, and best practice to avoid injury. The course is delivered through flexible learning as well as face to face training and culminates in a BTEC qualification and is ideally suited to training instructors, managers and other safety professionals who are responsible for safety training with regards manual handling techniques and safe practice.

A new device that is being used in these safety courses is the Back Track which is worn on the trainees back to monitor posture and movement during manual handling training exercises - it will vibrate and make a sound whenever the wearer adopts a position or makes a movement that could put them at risk of injury and thus helping the individual to correct any mistakes, this will help to train them to use better manual handling methods.
The 2 day course is a must for anyone who wants to be a safety trainer in their organisation or workplace and it will help them get a good grounding in safety principles, law and regulations, a thorough understanding of the mechanics of the spine in relation to manual handling activities and the application of efficient principles of movement in various manual handling situations. The outcome of which would be an improved knowledge of modern manual handling techniques along with physiological understanding and the necessary tools to train employees appropriately.

working in confined spaces

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

As I said before, confined spaces are one of the most dangerous environments you can work in so safety is of primary concern to all involved, or certainly should be - often in confined spaces you face a variety of dangerous and sometimes deadly scenarios, being trapped is obviously one of them others are being crushed, injured and most common of all, becoming asphyxiated, through oxygen starvation or poisoning due to toxic gases, fumes or other substances like liquids and particles. One of the commonest mistakes workers make prior to a life threatening accident is knowing that the environment has the potential to be deadly but assuming it will remain in a safe state during their time in there..

This assumption can turn out to be a terrible mistake as accidents can happen that the worker would not have expected. Like another worker could make a mistake that leads to flooding or filling the area with toxic or in other ways harmful or obstructive material while you are in the confined space. Or machinery, moving parts or live wires that were supposed to be not in use can be activated at the worst possible time for the unfortunate worker.

All of these scenarios actually happen in real life and the only real defence is knowledge and training. Using the right safety equipment, and training, training and more training. Every moment that you are going to be in that confined space needs to be planned and scheduled. Other members of staff in the plant or on site all need to be equally aware and available in a supportive role to ensure that you are not alone and no one is going to make a mistake that could cost you your life! Confined space training is a very important subject to me and I welcome your questions and comments.

Safety at work

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

When you work in a confined space, safety is a primary concern because your life is often in danger due to the extremely hazardous nature of the environment. Often I have had to crawl through tunnels, climb on confined walkways and ladders, even work submerged in hazardous underwater conditions, and, believe me, I made a point of getting as trained up in health and safety as I could because plenty of guys who either didn’t know or didn’t care about these things are either regretting it now because of their injuries or they are sadly no longer with us as a direct result.

You cannot over emphasise the danger of working in confined spaces - people die or suffer terrible injuries due to accidents happening in confined spaces, people also die or are injured when trying to help fellow workers who have become trapped in confined spaces. it may seem morbid or depressing, but these things happen all the time, so thinking about these scenarios, analysing how they occur is the best way to be able to help to prevent them from happening. Becoming trapped, asphyxiated or crushed are all common occurrences for people working in cramped and dangerous environments. Sometimes rescue workers can suffer terrible injuries and fatalities when attempting rescue operations as well, the only solution is knowledge. Being aware of the dangers and being familiar with the appropriate use of safety equipment often means the difference between life or death.

These are one of the most dangerous environments you can work in so safety is of primary concern to all involved, or certainly should be - often in confined spaces you face a variety of dangerous and sometimes deadly scenarios, being trapped is obviously one of them others are being crushed, injured and most common of all, becoming asphyxiated, through oxygen starvation or poisoning due to toxic gases, fumes or other substances like liquids and particles. One of the commonest mistakes workers make prior to a life threatening accident is knowing that the environment has the potential to be deadly but assuming it will remain in a safe state during their time in there..

This assumption can turn out to be a terrible mistake as accidents can happen that the worker would not have expected. Like another worker could make a mistake that leads to flooding or filling the area with toxic or in other ways harmful or obstructive material while you are in the confined space. Or machinery, moving parts or live wires that were supposed to be not in use can be activated at the worst possible time for the unfortunate worker.

All of these scenarios actually happen in real life and the only real defence is knowledge and training. Using the right safety equipment, and training, training and more training. Every moment that you are going to be in that confined space needs to be planned and scheduled. Other members of staff in the plant or on site all need to be equally aware and available in a supportive role to ensure that you are not alone and no one is going to make a mistake that could cost you your life!

Confined Space Training is a very important subject to me and a lot of the people I work with so I welcome your questions and personal accounts if they are relevant to this subject.

Welcome

Friday, January 18, 2013

Hello and welcome to my new blog - I welcome your questions and comments. This blog is going to be loosely based around a subject I have working experience in, which is confined space safety and training in the field of confined space safety. No, I don’t work in outer space! but if I did, a lot of the same rules and conditions would apply.. ie safety when working in cramped or confined spaces, which astronauts have to deal with throughout their training and working lives. As I said before I welcome your comments and thoughts and hope that in some small way this blog is of help to anyone about to work in a dangerous and confined space - a short version is - think safety - get training, use the right safety equipment! Hope to be posting again very soon, thanks for reading.